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1854 TREATY AUTHORITY

1854 Treaty Authority News

News and information from 1854 Treaty Authority
Jun
14

1854 News, NIIBIN 2022

1854 Treaty Authority's 2022 Niibin (summer) newsletter is now available...
 
Details on the 2022 Treaty moose hunt are within! Also included are reminders on access to ALL Minnesota State Parks by Tribal enrollees, lifting of reservation fees for Band Member use of Superior National Forest campgrounds, and the notice of the McDougal Lake campground closure. Check out the summary of the 2022 Moose Survey, and an update on manoomin restoration in the St. Louis River. Meet Resource Management’s 2022 seasonal staff.
 
 
(Image: Lake Sturgeon larval drift netting survey, June 2, 2022, St. Louis River - 1854 Treaty Authority)
 

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Jun
10

Moose Approved!

Moose show their approval of a new project to monitor snow depth in moose habitat!

Last fall, 1854 Treaty Authority resource management staff partnered with the Environmental Institute at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College and the NASA SnowEx program to monitor snow depth across the 1854 Ceded Territory as a part of the climate program’s efforts to track changing winter conditions. Images from one of the monitoring sites suggest another use for the snow depth measurement post as a FACE SCRATCHER. 

2021-2022 winter season data will be analyzed this summer, and we hope to follow through with expanding the program and establish more monitoring stations this coming winter.

For questions about this project contact Climate Biologist, Hilarie Sorensen:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(218) 722-8907

 

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May
18

Superior National Forest Camping Update 2022

Well, winter sprang into summer, and here we are! Anyone making plans to go camping?

1854 has updated the Superior National Forest Camping Information for the 2022 Season.

Following last year’s wildfires, there is only one campground closed due to burn damage - McDougal Lake Campground. Updates such as closures and/or restrictions, are listed on the Alerts and Notices page of the USFS Superior National Forest webpage. It is recommend to call ahead to the Range Station overseeing specific campground destinations for conditions before going out on the Forest, especially the BWCA Wilderness:

  • Gunflint Ranger Station: (218) 387-1750

  • Kawishiwi Ranger Station: (218) 365-7600

  • LaCroix Ranger Station: (218) 666-0020

  • Laurentian Ranger Station: (218) 453-8650

  • Tofte Ranger Station: (218) 663-8060

Reminder: Bois Forte and Grand Portage band members can camp at Superior National Forest campgrounds listed below without paying camping fees. 

NEW IN 2022: NO fees will be charged to Grand Portage or Bois Forte enrollees when reserving campgrounds ahead of time. Reservations can be made via the online system or by calling: 1-877-444-6777. If reserving online, please select the “Apply Discount” button when checking. If reserving via telephone, indicate that you are a band member to avoid being charged fees. *Campsite usage by “drop in” (daily) is still free for enrollees as before. Campers must have their 1854 or Tribal identification card on their person and provide their ID number and Band affiliation on campsite registration forms.

Superior National Forest campgrounds available for band member use without fees: 

  • Birch Lake 

  • Cadotte Lake  

  • Crescent Lake

  • Divide Lake

  • Devil Track Lake

  • East Bearskin Lake

  • Echo Lake

  • Fall Lake

  • Fenske Lake

  • Flour Lake

  • Iron Lake

  • Jeanette Lake

  • Kimball Lake

  • Little Isabella River

  • McDougal Lake

  • Ninemile Lake

  • Pfeiffer Lake

  • Sawbill Lake

  • S. Kawishiwi River

  • Temperance River

  • Trail’s End

  • Two Island Lake

  • Whiteface Reservoir

Information and updates for each individual campground can be found here: https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/superior/recreation/camping-cabins/?recid=36905&actid=29

Miigwech Forest Service for working to make this change and maintaining trust responsibilities!

  Campsite on Lake Jeanette

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May
17

'Agaaming Aki' (the land across the water)

An amazing opportunity for Bois Forte youth this summer...

Grand Portage has been a site of cosmopolitan partnership since well before the fur trade in the 1790’s. In a novel co-management situation, the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and the National Park Service collaborate to tell that story at the Grand Portage National Monument. Likewise, the Grand Portage Band is proud to have the significance of Isle Royale National Park acknowledged and designated as a ‘Traditional Cultural Place’ (dedicated August 2021). The 1854 Treaty Authority Education and Outreach Division prioritizes providing tribal youth with experiential opportunities with culturally significant resources and outdoor skill building. It is of utmost importance for tribal youth to invest in protecting, preserving and enhancing area natural/cultural resources as they grow to become the future stewards of rights (‘ways’) and resources (‘beings’) within the Indigenous ceded lands and the Lake Superior basin.

In partnership with Minnesota SeaGrant, the Grand Portage National Monument was initially awarded 2018 Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding project monies to hold science-based programming for youth. Postponed events in 2020 and 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic provided extra planning time for the management team to strategize how best to meet Great Lakes Environmental literacy principles through meaningful and indigenous-focused programing. With the addition of Tribal Interpretive staff leadership, careful planning was taken to orient the ‘Agaaming Aki’ program goals to fit tribal community needs and strengths. During the summer of 2022, Grand Portage youth will host Bois Forte peers and Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College ‘Gidaa’ camp youth in two ‘Agaaming Aki’ events. Through hands-on experiences, intertribal youth will network; build relationships and confidence through structured and unstructured near-shore, science-based activities, career exploration, and community connections on the Grand Portage Reservation and Isle Royale National Park. Camp activities will include:

  • Experience historic sites and natural features that define kinship on the landscape (ex. the main depot of the Northwest Trading company, High Falls on the Pigeon River, Isle Royale, Little Sprit Cedar Tree)

  • Investigate shoreline processes that sustain lake-wide food chains

  • Participate in a Lake Superior Lake Trout monitoring survey and subsistence activities

  • Engage over evening campfires; witness a Ojibwe/Dakota star story presentation, craft with community members, and catch up on natural resource management career opportunities

Submit the APPLICATION by Friday June 17th, 2022

Read the FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

See the FULL PROGRAM FLYER

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May
13

1854 ID Updates Today in Vermilion

Need to update your 1854 ID? Swing over to the Vermilion Social center today from 10:30-3pm. Remember to bring another form of identification: US passport, Band ID, State Drivers license, MCT card, or birth certificate.
 
*1854 ID's will NOT be available at the 1854 Duluth-office today.
 
**REMINDER: On December 3rd, 2021, the 1854 Treaty Authority Board of Directors voted to extend the 1854 ID requirement amendment: 1854 ID card holders can use their tribal enrollment ID card for off-reservation, treaty harvest, in lieu of an 1854 ID card until December 31st, 2022.

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May
04

Update: Avian Influenza

by Morgan Swingen,  1854 Treaty Authority Wildlife Biologist 

 

This spring, a strain of highly-pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI or “avian flu”) has been circulating in wild birds. As these wild birds have been migrating back north for the summer, the virus has been spreading to both wild and domestic birds. 

This strain of avian flu appears to have the greatest impact on wild birds such as waterfowl (ducks, geese, swans) and raptors (eagles, hawks, owls). The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MN DNR) has been collecting information on observations of sick and dead wild birds, and has been testing birds in areas where the virus has not yet been confirmed. So far, the virus has been detected in wild birds in 29 counties of Minnesota. More information on avian influenza in wild birds in Minnesota, including a map of positive detections, can be found on the MN DNR’s website: https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/wildlifedisease/avian-influenza.html

Another main concern about the current strain of avian flu circulating is the impact on domestic birds such as poultry (chickens, turkeys, ducks). This strain of avian flu can quickly kill domestic birds, and is easily transmissible between birds. When a domestic bird tests positive for HPAI, the entire flock must be euthanized to prevent further spread of the disease. This is a major issue in commercial farms that produce eggs and meat from these birds. Minnesota is the number one producer of turkeys in the United States, with farms concentrated in the central and west-central parts of the state. More information on avian flu in domestic birds in Minnesota is available from the Minnesota Board of Animal Health: https://www.bah.state.mn.us/hpai/

If you see a sick or dead wild bird, you should not handle it, but should report it to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. People with backyard poultry flocks should do their best to keep domestic birds separate from wild birds, regularly inspect their flocks, and report any sick or dead birds to the board of animal health for testing.

The current strain of avian flu can be spread to humans from birds, but is uncommon outside of poultry farmers and is considered a low risk to the public.

 photo by Rick Anderson, 2022

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Apr
11

Call for Abstracts: 2022 Heart of the Continent Symposium

https://heartofthecontinent.org/

 
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Apr
04

2022 Moose Survey Results

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 4th, 2022

Contact: Glenn D. DelGiudice, moose project leader, 651-539-3314

 

DNR Researchers More Optimistic About Moose Population Wellbeing, Immediate Future

For the 11th year in a row, Minnesota’s moose population remains relatively stable. The 2022 population survey estimates the moose population at 4,700, statistically unchanged from the last survey, which was conducted in 2020.

Although there is no statistically significant change in the estimated population relative to 2020, this year’s estimated number of moose is the highest since 2011, when the population was midway through a steep decline.

Additionally, calves comprised an estimated 19% of the population and the estimated calf-cow ratio was 45 calves per 100 cows. This is the highest both indicators have been since 2005, when the population was near its peak and considered healthy. Both factors are indicators of potential improvement in reproductive success, which has a positive impact on population numbers.

While the continued population stability and indicators of reproductive success are good news, DNR researchers point out that Minnesota moose remain at risk long term. Presently, the moose population is 47% lower than its peak in 2006.

Both the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and the 1854 Treaty Authority contributed funding and personnel for the annual survey. The survey is available on the DNR’s moose management page.

 

Find more information about moose in Minnesota on the DNR’s moose management page (mndnr.gov/Moose).

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Mar
31

1854 News, ZIIGWAN 2022


1854 Treaty Authority's 2022 Ziigwan (spring) newsletter is now available!

It introduces the interactive 1854 Ceded Territory Fish Consumption Map. Check out opportunities in stewarding our relatives - like contributing your sugar bush data as we draw inferences as to how ininaatigoog is handling a changing climate, and helping reduce storm water erosion with a FREE rain barrel. Get involved in #Noojitoon, 1854’s outdoor scavenger hunt on Instagram. Included is a taste of Resource Management’s 2021 annual reports, reminders on changes to the Eagle parts request application process and changes to State Park entry for Tribal members. Join us in welcoming the return of Brown Thrasher and the rest of the birds as they prepare to nest.


READ IT HERE

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Mar
22

VIRTUAL Career Fair

Looking for adventure this summer? ZOOM in with us - learn about the outdoor, summer jobs available to Native Youth in NE Minnesota.

Tuesday April 5th, 2022

11:00AM - 12:00PM

Watch the RECORDED EVENT HERE

Please let us know you are coming: REGISTER HERE

ZOOM Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83791744540

Have an OUTDOOR job you would like to promote? Contact Marne: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Mar
17

Artist George Morrison Memorialized on New Forever Stamps

 
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Mar
15

This past week at 1854...

This past week at the Authority…

  Most Resource Management staff attended the St. Louis River Estuary Summit, which was hosted by the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve (the “NERR”) at UW-Superior. Talks and events took place both virtually and in person. Education/Outreach staff led bawa’iganaakoog making (manoomin harvesting sticks) at a River Talk during the St. Louis River Summit Tuesday evening.  

Invasive Species staff are keeping tabs on a few radio tagged Chinese Mystery snails, to understand their overwintering habits, get a better idea on their movement and lake areas utilized, and hopefully shed some light on potential control efforts. On the terrestrial invasives front, staff hit the road for Emerald Ash Borer surveillance. 

   

The 1854 Division heads joined both Bois Forte and Grand Portage councils on Wednesday in a meeting with the Minnesota DNR commissioner and staff as part of annual consultation.

And to highlight the more glamorous side of science, wildlife staff hit the field to collect deer pellets! This is part of an ongoing study to assess potential parasite transmission in overlapping deer and moose range: brainworm and liver fluke. Read more on the project here: https://www.1854treatyauthority.org/management/biological-resources/fisheries/reports.html?id=255&task=document.viewdoc

  

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Mar
08

Multiple Internships and Undergraduate Research Opportunities, Summer 2022

Multiple internships and undergraduate research assistants are needed in summer 2022, to work on the NOAA-funded project: "Harvesting Manoomin as a climate adaptation strategy." Student interns will support an interdisciplinary team of traditional ecological knowledge-keepers, natural resource managers, and social and environmental scientists seeking to understand: “What can Manoomin teach us about restoring ecological and social relationships and adapting to climate change?” The interns will work within a small cohort of peers, learning about wild rice through research, relationships and direct field experience. Interns will also help raise awareness about wild rice ecological & cultural significance and foster respect, responsibility, & adaptation.  Several internship positions are hosted by the UMN Center for Changing Landscapes. For more information, see position description here. Students may also go to the UMN employment site, and search for Job ID# 346186. To apply, send resume and cover letter to email Dr. Mae Davenport at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Two internship positions are also hosted by The Nature Conservancy in MN. For more information, including application instructions, go to careers.nature.org and search for Manoomin/Psiŋ (Wild Rice) Intern or system job ID# 51043. Applications close March 25, 2022. TNC internships are designed to be 10–12 week, full-time (35 hrs/wk) positions, with preferred start date in early July to overlap with wild rice harvesting and processing season in late August and early Sept. (More information below, or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with questions) Multiple interns are also needed to help with biophysical or social science research on wild rice through the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) internship. Application information can be found here All of these internship positions will offer rich opportunities for college students to participate directly in our collaborative research, and they are open to students from any university or tribal college. We especially welcome and encourage applicants from the communities and tribal colleges connected to our partners and partnership. In past summers, students from Fond du Lac, Menominee, White Earth, and several other Tribal communities have participated. Please share our openings with any interested college student from your community who is interested in gaining rich social science or biophysical research experience.   

The Nature Conservancy in MN seeks two Manoomin/Psiŋ (Wild Rice) Interns to participate in a collaborative climate adaptation project designed to provide meaningful experience relating to native/indigenous cultural ecology, environmental communication, wild rice lake ecology and monitoring, and climate adaptation in MN and WI. Manoomin and Psin are the Ojibwe and Dakota names for wild rice, respectively. The internships will support an interdisciplinary team of traditional ecological knowledge-keepers, natural resource managers, and social and environmental scientists seeking to understand: “What can Manoomin teach us about restoring ecological and social relationships and adapting to climate change?” The interns will learn about wild rice through research, relationships and direct field experience. Interns will also help raise awareness about wild rice ecological & cultural significance and foster respect, responsibility, & adaptation. 

This is designed as a 10–12 week full-time summer position (35 hours per week). The position timing is somewhat flexible, with a preferred start date of in early July in order to enable overlap with wild rice harvesting and processing season in August and early September. However, we will work with the selected applicants to determine a workable schedule, not to exceed 12 weeks/420 hours, including some flexibility on start /end dates. This position will require both office work and field work. There are two possible base office locations for this position, located in downtown Minneapolis, MN or in Cushing, MN. Due to COVID-19, office work may need to be conducted remotely; however, basic computing and other equipment needed to conduct job activities will be provided. This may allow greater flexibility for home base locations for interns. TNC-sponsored housing may be an option for interns near the Cushing, MN office. Field work will be conducted at a variety of locations throughout north central Minnesota and northern Wisconsin, therefore willingness and ability to travel will be necessary at certain times. This position requires a valid driver’s license and compliance with TNC’s Auto Safety Program. Interns will be provided with travel accommodations for field visits. Typical work schedule is Monday–Friday 9:00 am–5:00 pm with very occasional weekend events.    

The compensation for this position is $15 per hour, in addition to benefits.  Applicants will need to use the Conservancy’s online system to apply.  For more information about the position or to apply, please go to careers.nature.org and search system job ID # 51043 (or search on job title).  Applications will close March 25, 2022.

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Mar
07

Last Week at 1854...

Last week at 1854…
 
Enforcement held a winter wilderness survival program for the Northwoods 5th and 6th grade on Tuesday. Marty and Leo covered shelter building, key items to put in your survival pack, and choosing the best signs to call for help.
   
 
Resource Management published their 2021 program reports! Their meticulous data collection and other amazing work is available to the public on the Reports page of the 1854 website: https://www.1854treatyauthority.org/reports/reports.html
 
Nick and Tony took to the skies on Wednesday. They assisted Bois Forte in completing the 2022 aerial moose survey over reservation lands.
  
 
1854 Education/Outreach hosted the Cook Co Middle School in the 2022 winter exploratory day ice fishing on Kimball Lake. Chi miigwech to agency partners who helped us trudge through 3 feet of snow, and catch some beautiful trout!
       
And last but not least, after a week and a half without heat on the North side of the 1854 offices, Sonny, Morgan and Hilarie are happy to have the temperature restored!
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Mar
01

2022 Summer Seasonal Vacancies

1854's Resource Management Division is hiring three (3) seasonal positions; a Fish and Wildlife Aide, and two (2) Invasive Species Aides. Application materials (including application for employment) are due March 18th, 2022.

     
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Feb
08

Outdoor Photo Scavenger Hunt Continues, 2022

 
  • Follow @1854TA on Instagram
  • Starting February 7th, 2022, 1854 will post a seasonal, photo-cropped "clue". You have one week to get outside, capture a snapshot and message us an image of the object along with #noojitoon
  • If you figure out the clue and message us before the week is up and the answer is revealed, you get 2 entries into the prize drawing. If you message us after we provide the answer, you get1 entry into the prize drawing.
  • 1854 will post a new clue about every 2 weeks.
  • At the end of the year, we will draw a WINNER to take home a survival backpack equipped 'With all the goods to keep you going strong on all your outdoor adventures’!
  • By submitting Instagram photos to the 1854 Outdoor Scavenger Hunt, you agree that your submission may be posted on the 1854 Treaty Authority Instagram page, newsletter and/or website, and that your submission is original content created by you that does not violate any third party rights.
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Feb
04

Minnesota State Park Access for All Tribal Members

2022-permit-1080x1080

As of January 1st, 2022, American Indians who are members of federally recognized Tribes within Minnesota’s borders can access each of Minnesota’s 75 state parks and recreation areas free or charge. This ensures Tribal members’ access to ancestral lands, and acknowledges the importance for continued community visitation to culturally significant places. The Minnesota DNR successfully worked with the Governor’s office and the State Legislature to change the law so Tribal members can obtain a state park vehicle permit at no cost. 

When the law changed, the Minnesota DNR coordinated with Tribal government representatives to ensure a welcoming and effective approach. Each of the eleven federally recognized Tribes participated in coordination meetings with DNR staff to determine how Tribal membership is defined, and the kind of identification needed for members to receive a permit. 

To receive a state park vehicle permit, Tribal members must present one of the following at the park office: 

  • Tribal identification card
  • a certificate of Indian blood
  • an 1854 Treaty Authority Window Cling
  • 1854 Treaty Authority ID card
  • Tribal license plates displayed on a vehicle

 

If the office is closed, self-payment envelopes can be used at the park entrance with “Tribal Permit” written over the payment section (shown below). Check with your Tribal government if systems are in place to obtain permits through them.  Additional information on Minnesota state park vehicle permits can be found HERE

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Feb
03

2021 Youth Deer Hunt Raffle Winner

Congratulations to our 2021 Youth Deer Hunt raffle drawing winner! Miigwech Angeline for participating in this past season’s 1854 deer hunt and continuing the practice of treaty harvest. Not only did Angeline put her time in in the woods but was also successful in bringing home waawaashkeshi wiiyaas! Angeline scored a Browning Spec Ops EDGE 20-Megapixel Trail Camera. You go girl! We need more tribal youth like you to carry on these traditions. #beagoodancestor

  
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Feb
01

Registration Still Open: Sugar Maple Virtual Storytelling Event, 2/8/2022

Join us Tuesday, February 8th, 2022 at 6pmCST/7pmEST for an evening of sharing - elders, harvesters and resource managers come together from across sugar maple range to speak about the importance of our relationship with Ininaatigoog (sugar maple trees). The virtual event will be hosted on Zoom and Facebook LIVE. Participants that are unable to enter Zoom, can attend the event via the livestream on the 1854 Treaty Authority's Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/1854-Treaty-Authority-114893538524154
 
*Continuing Education credits are available upon request
 
 
 
Join the Ininaatig Storytelling Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/156452003273587
 
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Jan
28

Native Youth Climate Adaptation Leadership Congress

U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

 

NEWS RELEASE

For Release: Through February 28th, 2022

 

Contact: Alejandro Morales, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 612-713-5175 

 

Future Native Conservation Leaders Are Encouraged to Apply for the Native Youth Climate Adaptation Leadership Congress 

 

The National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, West Virginia will be hosting the 8th annual Native Youth Climate Adaptation Leadership Congress, starting June 26 – June 30, 2022. The mission of the Native Youth Congress is to develop future conservation leaders with skills, knowledge, and tools and address environmental change and conservation to better serve their schools and home communities.   

   

While exploring culture, tradition and science to answer a big question posed at the beginning of the week, students will lead the congress and focus on major challenges in their communities. The students create themes based on their initial answers to the big question. These themes will emphasize the importance of language, elders, political involvement, traditional values, cultural preservation, and social-economic and environmental awareness.  

   

“The Native Youth Congress has grown over the years into a multi-faceted program that provides an open safe space for students to learn about other cultures and environmental issues while gaining confidence in their own cultural values,” says Native Youth Congress co-coordinator Jenn Hill. “We developed the native youth adaptation congress to reflect their identity, empower their future and the next generation of conservation leaders.”  

 See the PROGRAM FLYER

Tribal youth groups interested in joining the Native Youth Congress should have between 3-5 students, consist of rising high school seniors, be a part of a federally recognized Native American tribe, and sophomores and juniors will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Applications for this program can be found at NYCALC.org and will be accepted December 1st - February 28th, 2022.   

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work, visit  http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page. 

-FWS-

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